Interdependent Infrastructures

One of our team’s core competencies is the modeling and simulation of socially-coupled physical infrastructures that are complex and networked. We use high-resolution scalable models and an interaction-based computer modeling and simulation approach to study interdependencies among societal infrastructures. Examples of these systems include urban regional transportation systems, national electrical power markets and grids, communication systems, and the internet. These systems consist of large numbers of interacting physical, technological, informational, and human components whose global system properties are a result of interactions among local system elements. The computational methods allow our researchers to specify, design, and analyze simulations of extremely large systems and implement them on massively parallel architectures.

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Projects

AccuWeather

Project Contact: Bryan Lewis / Jiangzhuo Chen
Funding agency: AccuWeather, Inc. AccuWeather

AccuWeather provides superior accuracy in its weather forecasting, and through our collaboration we use our cutting-edge forecasting technology to provide them with highly detailed four-week influenza activity forecasts down to the county and state level. Additionally, our weekly executive summaries of current activity along with these forecasts are used to update AccuWeather corporate partners as they make business decisions surrounding influenza.

 

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Comprehensive National Incident Management System (CNIMS)

Project Contacts: Chris Barrett, Madhav Marathe
Funding Agency: Defense Threat Reduction Agency DTRA

This project seeks to develop fundamental science that can drive the response to, and planning for, significant national incidents, from infectious disease outbreaks to catastrophic natural and human-initiated disasters. Real-world problems identified and posed by stakeholders drive this fundamental and applied research program. Past applied work has included real-time epidemic response, a variety of infectious disease forecasting, tabletop planning support, and detailed policy analysis for the response to outbreaks.

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DIBBS CIF21: Middleware and High-Performance Analytics Libraries for Scalable Data Science

Project Contact: Anil Vullikanti / Madhav Marathe
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation National Science Foundation

This collaborative project is supported by scientists from a variety of domains, including network science, epidemiology, spatial GIS, biomolecular simulations, pathology, computer vision, and remote sensing. This project addresses the need for high-performance data analytics with efficient parallel algorithms using a novel approach, centered on combining the breadth and productivity of best practice commodity Apache Big Data Stack (HPC-ABDS) and high-performance computing. The project will produce two types of key building blocks: Middleware for Data-Intensive Analytics and Science (MIDAS) and the Scalable Parallel Interoperable Data Analytics Library (SPIDAL). MIDAS and SPIDAL are motivated and tested by the applications in different domains.

 

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EAGER SSDIM: Ensembles of Interdependent Critical Infrastructure Networks

Project Contact: Henning Mortveit / Madhav Marathe
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation National Science Foundation

The NSF’s EAGER program seeks to develop mathematical techniques and algorithms for constructing ensembles of infrastructure networks and social interactions. In addition, it seeks to develop methods for validation and verification of the interdependent networks incorporating physical infrastructure, humans, and their interactions. A particular emphasis is on synthetic power and communication networks. This class of networks appears prominently in research and applications under NSF’s CRISP program (hyperlink to https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505277). Constructing algorithms for generating realistic versions of such networks has many benefits. For example, it provides insight into their structure and behaviors, as well as sensitivities and inter-dependencies. Actual data for critical infrastructure networks is often proprietary, confidential, expensive, or simply impossible to obtain. Our work, which deposits generated network data on platforms like DesignSafe, offers researchers and practitioners of CRISP access to realistic networks that can help in analysis as well as method development and testing.

 

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From Space to Front Porch: Connecting Earth Observations to Health Outcomes

Project Contact: Samarth Swarup
Funding Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA

This project is designed to enhance hazard mitigation planning and emergency response products currently available at the national level through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Geospatial Research, Analysis and Services Program. Researchers from the University of Virginia, in partnership with other researchers in the United States, will investigate the use of NASA Earth Observations data and detailed synthetic information-based simulations to develop an improved social vulnerability index in the context of Hurricane Harvey, one of the costliest and most catastrophic hurricanes on record.

 

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Heavy Load Ahead

Project Contact: Samarth Swarup
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation National Science Foundation

This planning NSF grant supports work with public transportation managers in two Washington, D.C. metro-area counties to develop a proposal for a multi-level, integrated investigation into:

  • Individual- and organizational-level factors influencing the provision and use of information from crowdsourcing apps and other digital technologies in transportation
  • Cognitive impacts of perceived information overload on drivers, public managers, and planners (consumers and producers of information)
  • Effects of overload on transportation incidents and patterns
  • Effects on transportation system performance of different types, levels, and quality of crowd-sourced transport information

 

 

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Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Portal

Project Contact: Mandy Wilson
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) USAID

The IPM Portal application simplifies coordination of reporting for USAID Feed the Future Projects. In addition to handling travel requests (from trip allocation through reporting after travel is complete), this web application also facilitates coordination of several scheduled reports required by USAID, including publications, semi-annual reports, open data/data definition language reporting, and technical workplans. The system also includes a “Request for Application” module which allows administrators to accept concept notes and proposals from project managers who wish to work on the larger USAID grant.

 

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Organizing Decentralized Resilience in Critical Interdependent-infrastructure Systems and Processes

Project Contact: Chris Kuhlman / Anil Vullikanti
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation National Science Foundation

The goal of the ORDER-CRISP (Organizing Decentralized Resilience in Critical Interdependent-infrastructure Systems and Processes) project is to study damage-inducing mechanisms such as wind, rain, storm surge, and flooding. We model their effects on damage to both infrastructure (e.g., transportation, communications, electric power, potable water) and human (social/societal) networks. In particular, our focus is on understanding these interacting utility infrastructures and devising and assessing methods that make human populations more resilient before, during, and after natural disasters. Topics being studied include social isolation, social support structures, social vulnerability indices, and various well-being indices.

 

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Simulation tools for Pest Risk analysis accounting for Ecological and Anthropogenic Drivers (SPREAD)

Project Contact: Abhijin Adiga
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) USAID

Our complex food systems serve as conduits for the rapid spread of invasive species of agricultural crops. In this multi-disciplinary effort consisting of researchers from the United States, Europe, Asia, and Africa, we are developing high-resolution computational models to study the spread of one such insect, Tuta absoluta, a devastating pest of tomato plants. This species accounts for multiple pathways of spread such as self-propelled, trade, and human mobility.

 

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SocioNeticus

Project Contact: Mark Orr / Parantapa Bhattacharya
Funding Agency: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) DARPA

This program develops simulation methods that integrate sociological, cognitive, and neural theory into at-scale, data-heavy social simulations using a newly developed agent-based modeling platform (the MATRIX). By virtue of the platform, this work also has implications for the foundations of sociological, cognitive, and neural theory.

 

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