Institute News

In alignment with the University of Virginia’s goal to move its research from prominence to preeminence, deans, faculty, and researchers from across Grounds got together to participate in the formal launch of the Contagion Science program, an initiative funded by the University as part of its Prominence-to-Preeminence STEM initiative.

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With a long and successful career steeped in statistics, the University of Virginia Biocomplexity Institute’s Sallie Keller will step into a new post that might well have been tailor made for the nationally recognized research scientist. Keller will join the U.S. Census Bureau as chief scientist and associate director for research and methodology lending her scientific knowledge and expertise to advise the Census Bureau’s programs and continued need to produce high-quality statistical products describing America and for use by decision makers in many roles.

Census

An independent team of former census directors and prominent social scientists based at the University of Virginia (UVA) is helping the agency meet their goals, and last week it released a progress report on its 4-year effort. “The Census Bureau is already moving in the right direction, and we’re hoping to help them get there by exploring some of the scientific issues that need to be addressed,” says Sallie Keller, a UVA statistician leading the team along with former Census Director Kenneth Prewitt.

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Census

A research team at the University of Virginia has set its sights on developing new and better measures of America’s people, places, and the economy through a comprehensive innovation they call a Curated Data Enterprise. The research is being done in collaboration between the U.S. Census Bureau and UVA’s Biocomplexity Institute with additional support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The last couple years have been a bear for all of us — and the federal government wasn’t immune. But we’re betting that few federal agencies had it as rough as the U.S. Census Bureau, the federal agency charged with collecting all sorts of data — from who lives here, to where we live, to how much we pay for our homes. The pandemic wreaked total havoc on the decadelong plans to conduct the 2020 census, which dictates everything from states’ representation in Congress to the flow of billions of dollars in federal money.

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A U.S. Census Bureau survey that is the premier source of yearly information about the nation’s population and workforce needs millions more in funding to encourage participation and produce more accurate and timely results, according to a report released Tuesday.

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